Mentoring … how important is it?

Throughout my time here it has been an interesting experience with mentors. It’s something I have greatly been touched by others here in the College of Business. It’s definitely a hard transition into Barsema Hall as a freshman not knowing anyone and only having two business classes throughout your entire freshman year. Two mentors that have stuck out to me over the past two years have been Zach Fiegel and Jacob Ferguson. Jake and Zach are students here at Northern Illinois University and have proven they are both leaders of the college and the university. Both Jake, Zach, and I have participated in multiple organizations, internships, consulting projects and even study abroad.

It’s the idea of being pushed to go outside your comfort zone…it’s something that not many people make you do. These two were great advocates in that I remember one day after my EPFE 201(Honors Literature) class, Jake asked me to stop by NIU CAUSE (a Social Entrepreneurship student organization) on that Tuesday night. After a few meetings I felt it was time to get involved so I started by joining the fundraising committee where I would go out and look for sponsors for our organization, ranging anywhere from Vietnamese restaurants to pizza places. I thank Jake to this day for helping me transition throughout CAUSE as well as Zach as the experience has made me who I am today.

Organizations for me relate directly to the workplace because you’re working in groups of people who come together from different backgrounds, all trying to solve a problem or reach one goal. Another example of this has been through Delta Sigma Pi where all of us are various business majors throughout the college. Our members range from freshman all the way to seniors. This becomes invaluable when our members give young members advice on classes, teachers and even certain internship contacts for summer internships. I feel this would be very useful for the freshman and sophomores who aren’t involved in student organizations as it greatly helps with study groups, advice on electives to take and even just when to take these classes.

In closing, with great mentoring we become great leaders and exemplify the college as a whole. Something to think about the next time you’re in the Barsema Atrium.

 

 

Appreciation and Mentoring

The other day I had someone hand me a thank you card with a long-winded verbal thanks for all the help I gave them in prepping them for their Advanced Professional Selling (MKTG 450) interview in order to be accepted into the course.

Now, I worked with several people, all for several hours in going over their cover letter, resume and the actual interview process. I wanted to make absolutely sure that they would be overly prepared in order to get accepted into the course. They were all appreciative of my efforts in helping them but one person stood out the most. The handwritten thank you note along with the sincere verbal thanks was fantastic.

I get nothing out of spending time with these people, it doesn’t help my grade, I don’t get any sort of extra credit or recognition. I do it because I enjoy mentoring someone and sharing my knowledge and experiences to help them achieve their own goals. I’ve always been taught how far a thank you letter or note goes but I had never actually received one for myself from someone. I can see why recruiters or managers enjoy getting thank you cards from applicants or employees. It does mean a great deal to an individual when its recognized by others that their time or resources are appreciated.

I do look forward to continuing my involvement with the College of Business after I graduate and specifically my programs/department. I’ll certainly get a lot of intrinsic satisfaction knowing I can influence, motivate, inspire or mentor someone along their journey through school and into a career path they’ll enjoy.

This is just the thought of the day for me, but to turn it into a lesson learned/passed along:

1) Show appreciation to others for their time, their help or other non-obligatory efforts. It certainly goes a long way.

2) Whether you’re in school or you graduated; take time to help others achieve their goals because whether you realize it or not, a lot of people took their time to help you achieve yours.