The 2-2-2 Rule

This next guest post is written by Mike Glassberg, an Interactive Marketing Student at the NIU College of Business. Follow him on twitter @cubswin716.

 The 2 2 2 Rule

For most of my college life, I’ve prided myself on the relentless perseverance to reach any and all of my goals and to never give up. This also meant giving 110% in all activities. Giving anything less felt like a failure, something I refused to let happen.

And at the beginning of my first Senior semester, that’s what I did: gave 110% in every activity, project, or assignment that was handed to me – or at least I tried. But it was overwhelming being a leader in two organizations, working for the university, being a Junior Consultant in the Experiential Learning Center (ELC), all on top of my regular class schedule.

 

In college, and in life, you need to understand what’s important to you and prioritize accordingly. Over the last few months, I’ve implemented a new rule into my life: the 2 weeks, 2 months, and 2 years rule.

What will this matter to me in 2 weeks? 2 months? 2 years?

My most memorable use of the “2-2-2″ rule was from a few weeks ago; I had 10+ page midterm due the next morning. My friend had called me that night as I was typing away, and explained to me a serious personal problem she was going through. I value our friendship very much, and want it to last well over two years. So instead of telling her I was busy with a big paper, I used the 2-2-2 rule and decided that I’d get over the poor grade of my midterm paper in two months, but it would  hopefully mean a lot more to her in two months that I was there for her, especially when I was at my busiest.

This rule of thumb has turned me from a bag of hammers to, well let’s say a few hammers. Don’t get me wrong, I’m still stressed, but its focused in the right places and allows me to be excellent in the areas I care most about.

I strongly urge you to use the rule of 2, immediately. Today. Use it in class when you get an answer wrong and are feeling down. Use it when your best friend can’t make your big party. Use it when you have a dilemma and can’t decide between two alternatives.

I hope this helps you in relieving stress and choosing between alternatives as much as it has helped me!

Go Huskies!

-Mike

Carpe Diem

A wise man once told me that you get three options in College: social life, good grades, and sleep.  The catch is you only get to pick two.  This year, I’ve chosen social life and good grades so you may have seen me sleepy on more than one occasion in Barsema.  This same wise man tells me that food shares a very similar formula: Hot, ready, or delicious.  Again, you only get to pick two (think about it, you can’t have all three. Trust me, I’ve tried!).  I think he’s put some real thought into this stuff!  Anyways, as a senior in college, I want to leave no regrets on the table upon graduation.  I will forsake the time that normal people dedicate to sleep to do school work or to go out with friends and make memories that will last longer than any ride on the struggle bus.Struggle e1349968039215 300x122 Carpe Diem

Sure, sometimes I will take a weekend to myself and hang around my apartment or at home; I just try my best not to make it a habit.  People consistently tell me from their own experiences to live college life to the fullest.  Just last week I was scrolling through our student voices blog and that philosophy was reinforced by a post from previous blogger, Nick Lo Vetere.

In his post he states, “The fall semester felt like it was over as soon as it began and the spring semester feels almost as if everything over the past several months happened in a matter of a week.”

He goes on to state that he would take advantage of every opportunity from going out with friends to forming new relationships.   His parting quote from the post reads, “I can only hope that if incoming college students stumble across this post that they go to school with the notion that it will go by quick and they need to take advantage of everything as early as possible.”

I feel that I have waited too long to really begin my own experience especially after being stuck at a community college for the first half.  Now I feel like I am trying to play catch up and I’m jamming four years worth of experiences into a two year timeline here at NIU.  I feel that I have done a fair job but there is only so much time left where you’ll have a month off in winter, a week off every spring, and three months off for summer.  Please heed our advice when we say that College moves very quickly.  As Ben Franklin, one of our nation’s founding fathers used to say, “Lost time is never found”.frankling 300x167 Carpe Diem

Plan out your time early and often and make your college years memorable.  Go on a road trip or see someplace foreign.  Go out to apple orchards in the fall or kayak down a river in summer.  Do whatever you want; just do something!  Go out of your comfort zone and do something remarkable (I’m thinking skydiving for me).  Don’t leave college saying I should have done THAT because who knows when the next opportunity to do THAT will be. 2.0out

 

Reflections on Barsema Hall

So here I am, sitting in the atrium enjoying a midday hotdog and I can’t help but feel like I’m a part of something much bigger than myself.  The atrium feels energetic and full of life.  It is the proverbial heartbeat of the college and it is such an interesting and diverse place to be in.  Not only is it a place where students take a moment to relax and socialize with their peers but it doubles as a study area where they can complete assignments and other tasks.  This work and play atmosphere provides an interesting dynamic to the feel of the space.

As I finish my hotdog, I step outside where I overlook Dad’s Pond from the terrace.  This is my place to reflect.  In between classes you will often find me here pondering my next move.  It’s as though I’m playing a game of chess with life and my responsibilities are the pieces.  The benches along the walkway provide me with a moment of clarity and the breeze that passes by comes with almost a rhythmic frequency (*contented sigh*).  Just before I get too relaxed, I head back inside to move to my next task. BarsemaSunrise 1024x681 Reflections on Barsema Hall

The thing I enjoy most when I step back inside is the fact that I really feel like a young professional when I enter Barsema Hall.  I am surrounded by the future which is kept in the hearts and minds of my peers and in the walls of the institution.  The future is born from our motivation and our dreams and I get the opportunity everyday to see other students working hard to live out their own!

For the amount of time that I spend in this building I could almost call it home (I’d rather not call it that because then they’d start charging me rent).  The faculty make me feel at home and not a day goes by where I don’t speak with my professors outside of class.  A majority of the time, the conversations never have anything to do with classes or related projects.  Students will walk by and say hi and it all feels like I have an extended family here.  These people have grown with me professionally and worked beside me for the past year.  Going through that process really seems to strengthen the ties between students here at the College of Business.

When I was younger I thought that I’d just become another number in College…how much further could I have been from the truth.hot dog 300x225 Reflections on Barsema Hall

These thoughts I catalogued above came to me courtesy of a few minutes between class and a hot dog.  Imagine that.  Anyways, thanks so much to Dennis and Stacey Barsema for providing this amazing building and thank you to the faculty and students that breathe life into the NIU College of Business.  Give yourselves a pat on the back.  Together, we’ve made a population of students into a community of students! 2.0out

Getting Involved: Part 3 of 6

Nick graduated in Spring 2012 and within a couple of days, we’ll hand over the reins to our new student bloggers for the Fall 2012 semester. Until then, here’s one of the top posts from last semester.  This is Part 3 of 6 of the “Getting Involved” series of posts.  Whether you’ve read this particular post or not, we hope you will find it helpful and useful. We’re excited to share it with you again!  And be on the look out for a flurry of new posts from our new bloggers!

 

Getting Involved

This is post three of a six part series about involvement on campus. Part one discussed why I got involved, part two explained why I didn’t get involved sooner, part three touches on the opportunities available through being involved, part four talks about leadership experience, part five explains how to go about getting involved and briefly what it takes up front and part six are my thoughts going forward for post graduation involvement.

Getting Involved; Part 3: New Opportunities

The context in which I’m drawing on my experience is in reference to business organizations, versus overall general involvement. Although the principles I’m going to touch upon can be applicable to things such as athletics or fraternities in some instances and not just limited to academic organizations.

Through joining AMA and CSAB it provided me with great opportunities to easily make new friends built on a foundation of common interest. Some of the friendships I’ve developed in these organizations carry on even though lots of my friends graduated in May 2011. I still keep in contact, still see these people in a social setting, and see them in professional settings as well. The connections I’ve developed extend beyond the walls of this college or any graduation date.

Another essential opportunity is one for professional networking. Anyone in business will tell you that networking is extremely important to anyone at any point in their career, especially college students. Aside from networking with your peers you have the opportunity to meet professionals from various industries. You can learn about marketing in the social media realm, the retail sector, the insurance world, etc. With today’s technology it makes it even easier to keep these people as contacts through platforms like LinkedIn. Because of my involvement with these organizations there are recruiters, sales managers, or sales representatives from various companies that now know my face and name. They don’t hesitate to stop me and chat if they see me at College of Business or marketing department functions.

This wouldn’t be possible had I not been involved and networked to the best of my ability with whom I’ve had access to. Down the line you never know if you’ll end up working for this individual, using the people you’ve met as referrals or doing business with them in the future. I’ve learned that people hire or do business with someone they know and like. It sort of pays homage to the saying “It’s not what you know it’s who you know.” Pair great networking abilities/opportunities with the tools and skills learned at the NIU College of Business and you have two huge components in setting yourself up for success down the road.

To conclude this section I’d like to share a story that perfectly illustrates everything I’ve discussed so far. As President of the Collegiate Sales Advisory Board it is one of my responsibilities to meet once a semester with the sales faculty, marketing department chair, occasionally the Dean of the College of Business and anywhere from 20 – 30 representatives from different national and worldwide companies that make up the Sales Advisory Board. The purpose of the Sales Advisory Board is for companies and faculty to collaborate on improving the sales program and making sure the curriculum being taught and certifications earned, are directly applicable in the real world.

I interviewed during the fall with a company that sits on the Sales Advisory Board. Going a step further, I interviewed with the actual representative himself, not of the companies recruiters. Somewhere along the line whether it was my interview or my online personality test results, they decided not to invite me in for a second interview. Nearly a month later, this individual and I are at the Sales Advisory Board meeting and I’m on the agenda to discuss CSAB’s activities as well as providing insight on discussion of where our sales program is headed for the future. After a couple of hours we break for lunch and the individual I previously interviewed with asked me to step outside with him. He then told me that he was extremely impressed with how I handled myself in front of a room full of sales executives and faculty from my school. He then told me that they have people going to final interviews a week or two later and he’d like me to be there. He even arranged (minutes after talking to me) the second interview for me to complete which was clearly just a formality. I interviewed well at their final interview event and a day later he called me himself with my job offer. I can firmly say that had I not been president with the responsibility to represent the students of my program, I would have been just another person viewed as not being a good fit for that company. My involvement directly correlated to me getting a job six months prior to my graduation date.

What opportunities have come your way through being involved?? Share below!

In my next post, part 4, I talk about the leadership experience gained through being involved. Stay tuned!

Getting Involved: Part 2 of 6

Nick graduated in Spring 2012 so now we’re lining up more student bloggers who will start in the Fall 2012 semester. Until then, Student Voices is sharing with you the top posts from last semester…the “Getting Involved” series of posts.  Here’s Part 2 of 6.  Whether you have read this particular post or not, we hope you will find it helpful and useful. We’re excited to share it with you again!

 

Getting Involved

This post will be a several part series about involvement on campus. Part one discussed why I got involved, part two discusses why I didn’t get involved sooner, part three touches on the opportunities available through being involved, part four talks about leadership experience, part five explains how to go about getting involved and briefly what it takes up front and part six are my thoughts going forward for post graduation involvement.

***Spring break gets in the way of the succession of posts but this series will continue when classes resume on March 19. The blog will be quiet for the duration of break.***

Getting Involved; Part 2: Why Not Sooner

I always tell younger students or anyone I run into that I wish I had gotten involved sooner than my last two years here. In retrospect my reasons for holding off for so long seem sort of ridiculous but they were very real concerns at the time. My first thought was what if I join a marketing organization and then realize in my first year or two that I’m not cut out for the College of Business? I’d feel stupid joining only to drop out because I didn’t make it into my major. My next concern was joining without having had any marketing classes. I’d also feel stupid attending meetings and listening to speakers talk about concepts of which I have no prior knowledge.

Having been extremely active for two years now I realized those concerns were very wrong reasons to keep me from involvement. I should have pushed myself out of my comfort zone. Had I looked at it differently I would have realized that joining could provide extra motivation to get into the College of Business. It also would have provided me with extra insight into what I’d really be getting myself into with an education in marketing. I let my concerns inhibit my involvement instead of letting my involvement address my concerns.

Now that I’m nearing graduation I know I’ve made the right educational and career choice and my only regret was not joining sooner. I would love to have that time back to really make the most of the opportunities I missed.

What are some of the things that might be holding you back from getting involved? Feel free to let me know in the comments!

Also, please keep an eye out for the next post; the opportunities available through being involved coming on March 19th!

Getting Involved: Part 1 of 6

Nick graduated in Spring 2012, but we’re lining up more student bloggers who will start in the Fall 2012 semester. Until then, Student Voices is sharing with you the top posts from last semester. Whether you have read this particular post or not, we hope you will find it helpful and useful. We’re excited to share it with you again!

Getting Involved

This post will be a several part series about involvement on campus. Part one will discuss why I got involved, part two discusses why I didn’t get involved sooner, part three touches on the opportunities available through being involved, part four talks about leadership experience, part five explains how to go about getting involved and briefly what it takes up front and part six are my thoughts going forward for post graduation involvement.

Spring break gets in the way of the succession of posts but this series will continue when classes resume after Spring break. The blog will be quiet for the duration of break.

Getting Involved; Part 1: Why I Got Involved

I got involved in student organizations my second to last year in college. A major influence in getting involved in a student organization was of course, my father. He has always been a strong advocate of me being involved in something growing up and it certainly didn’t stop when I came to college. I too realized the need for involvement to have something on my resume to help me stand apart from all the college kids who attend school but who do nothing beyond class work.

When I finally made the decision to join, I also made the decision to become actively involved, not just sit back and relax. After my first American Marketing Association meeting the current board illustrated a need for someone with web maintenance skills (which I had) and I jumped on the opportunity. My first two weeks in AMA I got myself on the executive board. From there I went on to decline presidency and became Vice President for the 2011 – 2012 academic year. After absolutely loving my first semester in AMA, I joined the Collegiate Sales Advisory Board. After learning that the entire board of that organization would be graduating in May 2011 I took strides to become President for the 2011 – 2012 academic year.  Joining and becoming active in both of these organizations has paid of immensely for me in so many ways.

Stay tuned for Part 2; why I didn’t get involved sooner.

The Blog Experiment

Several months ago when I began research to start a blog on behalf of the College of Business I was trying to envision what it would look like, what it would discuss and how many people would be writing for it.

The original idea was to have several student bloggers sharing their experiences on the blog. What I came across (and what I ultimately want this blog to look like) would be Harvard’s student blog or Cornell’s student blog. Those are the idealistic vision of what I want this blog to turn into.

At first it was just me supplying the content but I soon expanded to “Guest Posts” in order to get other opinions or ‘voices’ involved. It is great and I’m certainly a fan of the guest posts. I’d still like to see this blog expand to multiple students which would hopefully represent different areas of the College of Business to bring more diversity and different experiences in various areas or majors.

I’ve gotten great feedback from peers and faculty who read the different posts on this blog. It’s great knowing people out there are actually reading it and that they enjoy it. It’s a bit of a bummer that I’ll soon be leaving and the blog won’t have fresh content for awhile (until the fall semester begins). It also won’t be maintained by me any longer either. On the bright side, it will be someone new, with new thoughts, new feelings and new experiences.It will be a fresh change of pace.

I’ve laid the foundation of this blog for the future students who contribute to it. I’ll have to check in from time to time to read the new stories and watch its growth going forward.

Words of Advice

Last week I did a question and answer session with a College of Business (CoB) student named Rod. He is a very active individual in the CoB. He is a senior finance major and currently the VP of Community Service for his business fraternity Delta Sigma Pi (DSP).

I wanted him to share his thoughts and give words of advice to younger students/incoming students. The only thing I want to add is that I share the same opinions as Rod and think that what he has to offer in this Q&A is very helpful and valuable.

Nick: What lead you to be involved on campus?

Rod: One of the biggest things growing up is to give back to the community. Growing up in impoverished neighborhood I appreciated people coming in to tutor or give time to help someone else develop.

Nick: As a senior; why are you still staying actively involved even though graduation is three weeks away?

Rod: I have a passion to stay involved. Seeing the look on someone’s face when you help them and the big difference it makes to someone to spend a little bit of your time with them. It isn’t a right but an obligation or a duty to give back to our communities. It’s like sucking up crops without fertilizing the ground anymore for the future. I want to build on the legacy for others to further build upon in the future.

Nick: What makes you want to leave the College of Business better when you leave versus when you started here?

Rod: For us to continually be ranked atop the nation, we need to bring in better teachers and better resources for students to be the best that they can be. Personally, for people to become better people you must reinvest time in them.  We need to show people how to be a better person so they can do it on their own, similar to movie Paying It Forward.

Nick: What would you have done differently with your time here?

Rod: Academically, I no regrets, I leveraged every opportunity that came. I networked in events, and through my business fraternity (Delta Sigma Pi). The biggest downfall of underclassman is that they do not utilize all the resources around them. An unseen downfall is that they try to become members of so many things and they don’t focus on a handful and become over stretched. You can’t exert your full potential in any one organization. You don’t just join an organization to say you are part of it; you need to be able to devote time and resources in it to make it a great organization. Personally, as VP of Community Service for DSP I wouldn’t be able to hold the position because time would be pulled into other areas.

Nick: What advice can you give to current students and prospective students?

Rod: One of the Biggest pieces of advice I can give without touching on prior information, and is something I give to family friends and my girlfriend is this; step outside your comfort zone, put yourself in uncomfortable situations. It is the only way you can grow. Don’t be afraid to fail because through failure you learn from your mistakes and you become better at what you do. My Mother told me ‘if you’re going to fall, fall fast, so you can get up quick.’ You can apply the same principle for life not just academics. Go in full force and don’t be timid. If you try something and don’t like it, at least you know it’s not for you. But you won’t know until you try.

A big question prospective students get asked is what’s your major, what are you going to be? It is essential to know what you DON’T want to be. If you know what you don’t want to do you know not to go down that path and you can venture down other paths you haven’t been before to explore, grow and find what fits you.

I was an accounting intern at Deloitte for three summers and realized I don’t want to spend all this time out of my life per week for this particular career path. That’s how I ended up going into finance which is similar to accounting. It was a tough choice to switch paths and walk away from great earning potential in an accounting career. But it ended up being one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

Nick: Any final thoughts?

Rod: Meeting new people has been a big breakthrough in college/academic career. A Lot of people generally tend to stay grounded in their high school niche of friends. You never grow if you stay stagnant. I went from predominantly black grammar school to very diverse high school. I learned quickly to adapt to different cultures and ethnicities. When you go into work force you won’t be working strictly with one nationality or ethnicity. Meeting a variety of people in different settings enables you to learn to identify with each culture and what makes each one uniqueme 293x300 Words of Advice and different from its own.

One of the key take aways: Get out, meet new people, have fun, and take a chance. Like I said earlier don’t be afraid to try new things, don’t be afraid to put yourself out there. Take a risk; be it a calculated risk, but take one. Big gains come from big risk. If you see cute girl in the hall way, can’t get a date if you don’t talk to her! Take rejection as a form of constructive criticism; a checklist of what you need to work on to be a better person.

The final piece of advice: No matter what, stay true to who you are and your values. I walk to the beat of my own drum but I still get along with everyone. Be comfortable in your own skin and with who you are. If you don’t like it, do something about it. Never settle for a situation you aren’t comfortable with. Don’t fit in the box, make the box fit around you.

 

2012 Ethics Case Competition

Last week on Friday I participated in an Ethics Case Competition sponsored by the student organization LEAD. The fictional case we were given was about a salesman who was sent overseas in someone’s place in order to win a $50 million contract. The client then told the salesman to bring $6,000 – $7,000 worth of whiskey to the contract signing. The salesman knew there was a company gifting policy and guidelines on what constitutes bribery. However, he could not remember what the guidelines were, nor could he get hold of anyone from his company. It was up to us to do an analysis of the situation and make a recommendation in a ten minute presentation to a panel of judges.

I’m a competitive person just like my competition partner, Abbey Vanderwoude. That’s what drove us to spend a ton of time doing research, preparing our analysis, arguments and presentation. (Don’t be fooled, it requires a lot of effort to deliver a worthy presentation in this competition. You should devote quite a bit of time and energy to it).

Even though we ultimately fell short of victory it was still a good experience to participate in. Sure it was a fictional case, but in listening to Dennis Barsema‘s keynote that day and in talking with my father who also is in sales, situations like this occur in the real world.

It is no surprise that the NIU College of Business truly prepares you for ethical dilemmas and how to best approach them. The College of Business truly stands by its brand statement of “Where the Classroom Meets the Business World” and its philosophy of “Thinking & Doing.” Even though it isn’t really possible to teach someone how to be ethical; this college does do its share in teaching the concept of ethics and provides tools for people to take steps in the right direction. This college is after all, recognized for how it incorporates ethics in its curriculum (ranked 3rd in the nation in 2011 according to Businessweek).

Through an experience such as this and listening to other people’s experiences you can learn to guide yourself in the proper direction. In Mr. Barsema’s words, you need to understand yourself and your values to let your moral compass lead you down the right path in deciding between “doing things right and doing the right thing.”

I encourage everyone to participate in the Ethics Case next year if you have the opportunity to do it. It truly is a wonderful experience.

Appreciation and Mentoring

The other day I had someone hand me a thank you card with a long-winded verbal thanks for all the help I gave them in prepping them for their Advanced Professional Selling (MKTG 450) interview in order to be accepted into the course.

Now, I worked with several people, all for several hours in going over their cover letter, resume and the actual interview process. I wanted to make absolutely sure that they would be overly prepared in order to get accepted into the course. They were all appreciative of my efforts in helping them but one person stood out the most. The handwritten thank you note along with the sincere verbal thanks was fantastic.

I get nothing out of spending time with these people, it doesn’t help my grade, I don’t get any sort of extra credit or recognition. I do it because I enjoy mentoring someone and sharing my knowledge and experiences to help them achieve their own goals. I’ve always been taught how far a thank you letter or note goes but I had never actually received one for myself from someone. I can see why recruiters or managers enjoy getting thank you cards from applicants or employees. It does mean a great deal to an individual when its recognized by others that their time or resources are appreciated.

I do look forward to continuing my involvement with the College of Business after I graduate and specifically my programs/department. I’ll certainly get a lot of intrinsic satisfaction knowing I can influence, motivate, inspire or mentor someone along their journey through school and into a career path they’ll enjoy.

This is just the thought of the day for me, but to turn it into a lesson learned/passed along:

1) Show appreciation to others for their time, their help or other non-obligatory efforts. It certainly goes a long way.

2) Whether you’re in school or you graduated; take time to help others achieve their goals because whether you realize it or not, a lot of people took their time to help you achieve yours.